To Get The Most From Broccoli Consider How You Chop It

Broccoli has its place in our kitchens even if kale's popularity overshadowed the cruciferous vegetable for a while. To get the most out of it, chop it into small pieces.

 Add broccoli AFTER your broth is done and right before serving for the highest nutritional benefit.

Add broccoli AFTER your broth is done and right before serving for the highest nutritional benefit.

Best known for its cancer fighting properties, broccoli is high in fiber, vitamin C, and phytochemicals (the chemicals responsible for the color of the plant, taste and flavor)--which are known to help protect against and fight cancer. 

A phytochemical in broccoli, sulforaphane (common in cruciferous vegetables, highest in broccoli sprouts) appears to help reduce prostate and breast cancer risk. Sulforaphane is a naturally occurring sulphur that helps promote normal cell function and division. 

However, sulforaphane is not readily available for consumption. The broccoli needs to be chopped into small pieces, the more the better, to release the healthy antioxidants. Cooking it right away is not recommended. Rather, allowing your broccoli to sit for up to 90 minutes after chopping promotes creation of sulforaphane.

Eating broccoli raw is the top recommendation. Microwaving or boiling it even for a short time, greatly reduces the presence of sulforaphane. Stir frying for a short period of time, not more than four minutes after it has been allowed to sit (post chopping) for 90 minutes is another healthy option. 

Read the study for more detailed information.

Try our broccoli stir fry recipe to get the most out of broccoli tonight!

Sources
https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.jafc.7b05913
https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/04/03/how-sulforaphane-fights-cancer.aspx
https://www.livescience.com/45408-broccoli-nutrition.html
https://www.livestrong.com/article/478075-foods-high-in-catechins/

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